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Chat Transcript

Time of chat: 2/23/2017 8:55:17 AM
Length of chat: 815
Your name: Guest
Chatted with: Angela
   
8:55 AM Angela: Hello! How can I help you today?
8:56 AM Guest: what is the relative risk of using smokeless tobacco like General snus compared to smoking cigarettes?
8:56 AM Angela: Good morning! I have some information on that; let me get it for you.
8:56 AM Angela: I'll be right back.
8:56 AM Guest: thanks
8:57 AM Angela: sure!
8:57 AM Angela: Many individuals use smokeless tobacco despite its obvious drawbacks because they are hooked on nicotine, a highly addictive drug. As with cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products deliver substantial doses of nicotine along with powerful cancer-causing chemicals.
8:57 AM Angela: Because nicotine from smokeless tobacco is absorbed through the mouth, the drug takes longer to produce its rewarding effect in the brain than it does when it is absorbed through the lungs during cigarette smoking. The amount of nicotine obtained from smokeless tobacco is comparable to that of cigarettes, and once smokeless tobacco users become addicted they find it just as difficult as cigarette smokers do to quit
8:58 AM Angela: Chewing tobacco and snuff contain 28 cancer-causing agents. --Chewers are 50 times more likely than nonusers to get cancer of the cheek, gums, and inner surface of the lips. --Smokeless users are at greater risk for mouth cancer than are nonusers, and these cancers can form within 5 years of regular use. --Leathery white patches and red sores common in smokeless tobacco users' mouths can turn into cancer. --Tobacco juice can lead to cancer of the tongue, esophagus, larynx, stomach, pancreas, prostate, and the floor and roof of the mouth.
8:58 AM Angela: --Smokeless tobacco users have a higher risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and heart attacks due to the high concentration of salt in smokeless tobacco. --Chewers are at greater risk for high cholesterol than people who don't use tobacco. -
8:58 AM Angela: One can of snuff gives you as much nicotine as 60 cigarettes. Nicotine gives you the “buzz” but is highly addictive. 75% of cancers in the mouth, lips, tongue, throat, nose and larynx are due to tobacco use. 28 cancer-causing substances have been found in smokeless tobacco. long-term users have a 50% greater risk of developing oral cancers than non-users. Smokeless tobacco is harder to quit than cigarettes.
8:58 AM Angela: Smokeless tobacco contains MORE nicotine than cigarettes! Using snuff or chewing tobacco may give you three to four times as much nicotine as from smoking a cigarette. And the nicotine stays in the bloodstream longer. Use two cans a week and you'll get the same amount of nicotine as smoking a pack and a half a day.
8:59 AM Guest: But is there any difference in relative risks? Is using snus safer than smoking cigarettes for someone addicted to nicotine?
9:00 AM Angela: There are several things about that in the information above. For instance, one can of snuff gives you as much nicotine as 60 cigarettes.
9:00 AM Angela: Smokeless tobacco is harder to quit than cigarettes.
9:00 AM Angela: Smokeless tobacco contains MORE nicotine than cigarettes! Using snuff or chewing tobacco may give you three to four times as much nicotine as from smoking a cigarette. And the nicotine stays in the bloodstream longer. Use two cans a week and you'll get the same amount of nicotine as smoking a pack and a half a day.
9:01 AM Guest: So, are you telling me that using snus instead of smoking cigarettes doesn't actually lower health risks?
9:02 AM Guest: Might it increase them??
9:02 AM Angela: From the information I've seen, it does not seem at all that smokeless tobacco - instead of smoking cigarettes - lowers health risks.
9:03 AM Angela: It could increase some health risks - like cancers of the mouth, etc.
9:04 AM Angela: Your risk of certain types of cancer increases if you use chewing tobacco or other types of smokeless tobacco. This includes esophageal cancer and various types of oral cancer, including cancers of your mouth, throat, cheek, gums, lips and tongue. You also face an increased risk of pancreatic cancer.
9:05 AM Angela: Your family doctor can probably help you with this as well. You can talk to a counselor from your state's quitline by calling 1-800-QUIT-NOW (800-784-8669). The National Cancer Institute also offers help and information at 877-44U-QUIT (877-448-7848).
9:05 AM Guest: Thanks for that information. I guess it makes sense to stick with cigarettes until it is possible to totally quit all tobacco use. It is good to see how CDC advises on this.
9:06 AM Angela: I wish you the best of luck on quitting.
9:07 AM Angela: Please come back if you have other questions, if you'd like to share your quitting smoking journey, or if you'd like some encouragement.
9:07 AM Guest: Thanks. I think I'll need it.
9:07 AM Angela: You can do it!!
9:08 AM Angela: :)
9:08 AM Angela: There are a couple of medications that your doctor can prescribe that will help you quit. There's also nicotine patches, nicotine gum, and some other like products.

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